DPRG
DPRG List  



[DPRG] ASCII???

Subject: [DPRG] ASCII???
From: Charlie W Youngblood chaz128 at juno.com
Date: Fri Oct 10 08:59:01 CDT 2003

Walter,
	To put it very simply in plain english, ASCII is a standard for
generating text based characters on computers. You can use ASCII in
your programming if you want to display specific characters to an LCD
output on your robot, or if you want to send a comand to a sub processor
on your robot that is a string of characters. The text you are reading in
my
response is in ASCII. No special fonts, colors, HTML are added. That's
why all the hyroglyphics are at the end of your e-mail when I read it.
Your
e-mail is not using straight ASCII. ASCII is more universal and can be
read more easily by hardware and software. When your computer first
starts to boot up you may notice black and white text giving you some
information on the booting process, that is ASCII output. When you are
at the DOS prompt and you type something, that is in ASCII output. The
programming code for ASCII is as previously mentioned a numerical
value. I believe there are 256 total, with the 1st 128 being the most
com-
monly used characters. The alphabet in upper and lower case, numbers,
puctuation, and other symbals. This came about because the first
computers
with CRT displays were text based. Yes back in the dinosaur days we
didn't
have Windows, or Mac. In fact some of the first computers didn't even
have
monitors but just a string of lights which represented binary number
values.
Thus the 1s, and 0s.
	I hope this helps.

Charlie Youngblood
DPRG Librarian
--------- Begin forwarded message ----------
>From: MannyGerm at aol.com
To: dprglist at dprg.org

--part1_29.49662173.2cb7329d_boundary
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

hi,
   i'm doing a report on microprocessors, and i stumbled on some info
about 
ASCII. first of all, tll me if you can program in straight ASCII. is
ASCII just 
binary; or is it something similar but different in some way. the reason
for 
this question is if it's a variation of binary, i could do some really
cool 
stuff. what i mean by binary is e.g.: 1011010 woud be 14 because
1+3+4+6=14. 
regardless, i would also like to know what chips can carry out code in
ASCII. 
thanks.

                                happy roboting,
                                                  Walter Briggs

--part1_29.49662173.2cb7329d_boundary
Content-Type: text/html; charset="US-ASCII"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

<HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><FONT  SIZE=3D3 FAMILY=3D"SERIF"
FACE=3D"=
Times New Roman" LANG=3D"0">hi,<BR>
&nbsp;&nbsp; i'm doing a report on microprocessors, and i stumbled on
some i=
nfo about ASCII. first of all, tll me if you can program in straight
ASCII.=20=
is ASCII just binary; or is it something similar but different in some
way.=20=
the reason for this question is if it's a variation of binary, i could do
so=
me really cool stuff. what i mean by binary is e.g.: 1011010 woud be 14
beca=
use 1+3+4+6=3D14. regardless, i would also like to know what chips can
carry=
 out code in ASCII. thanks.<BR>
<BR>
</FONT><FONT  COLOR=3D"#000000" style=3D"BACKGROUND-COLOR: #ffffff"
SIZE=3D2=
 FAMILY=3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D"Arial"
LANG=3D"0">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbs=
p;&nbsp;  &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 
&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbs=
p;&nbsp;  &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;  happy roboting,<BR>
&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 
&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; =20=
&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 
&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; =20=
&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 
&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&n=
bsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Walter Briggs</FONT></HTML>

--part1_29.49662173.2cb7329d_boundary--
_______________________________________________
DPRGlist mailing list
DPRGlist at dprg.org
http://nimon.ncc.com/mailman/listinfo/dprglist

--------- End forwarded message ----------


________________________________________________________________
The best thing to hit the internet in years - Juno SpeedBand!
Surf the web up to FIVE TIMES FASTER!
Only $14.95/ month - visit www.juno.com to sign up today!

More information about the DPRG mailing list