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[DPRG] Re: MIT autonomous indoor helicopter .... but can it teach?

Subject: [DPRG] Re: MIT autonomous indoor helicopter .... but can it teach?
From: Piper pay_the_piper at shaw.ca
Date: Sun Nov 1 12:27:25 CST 2009

I like the Hans Moravec expression "human equivalency" better than "Turing test". Is HM a prof at CMU?

Maybe Moravec Junior who posts here could challenge Moravec Senior to a teaching test of human equivalency by sending a DPRGbot to CMU to compete with Senior on teaching ability in Robotics level _______ (K to PhD).

If it teaches better than Senior, the test of human equivalency then becomes a test of robot equivalency. Who at CMU can teach as well as DPRGbot? Who can go beyond robot equivalency?

It would be a lecture-giving Q-A robot, so we ask:

If a robot like R4P goes "psycho" and starts issuing robojibberish as below, who makes the diagnosis of robohebephrenia?

If robopsycho is far beyond human equivalency and is actually a superhuman AI and a machine as the late Colonel Corso says the so-called grey aliens were in "The Day After Roswell", who are we mere humans to judge that it is talking nonsense?

What happens to TT or HE testing when the verbot talks nonsense and is hidden from view? What are the norms for malfunctioning verbosity in man vs. machine?

What are the general social-political-religious norms in Andromeda? What if the alien says I am from Andromeda where humans are a gastronomical taste delight though of questionable nutritional value. Our species is called gastro sapiens.

Is "The Singularity" merely an encrypted word for mass psychosis and cultural regression on the Planet of the Apes?
  ----- Original Message ----- 
  From: Jeff Koenig 
  To: dprglist at dprg.org 
  Sent: Friday, October 30, 2009 11:15 AM
  Subject: Re: [DPRG] Re: MIT autonomous indoor helicopter .... but can it teach?


  LOL!



  On Fri, Oct 30, 2009 at 1:03 PM, Piper <pay_the_piper at shaw.ca> wrote:

    01110000001111110010101101111111
      ----- Original Message ----- 
      From: Jeff Koenig 
      To: dprglist at dprg.org 
      Sent: Friday, October 30, 2009 11:27 AM
      Subject: Re: [DPRG] Re: MIT autonomous indoor helicopter .... but can it teach?


      Admit it, Piper.  You're a Turing test, right?




      On Fri, Oct 30, 2009 at 12:11 PM, Piper <pay_the_piper at shaw.ca> wrote:

        On "Futurama" Fry plugs a coin into a mechanical gypsy woman in a booth (like a telephone booth) and lo and behold out pops a few sooths of the soothsayer. Educational sooths are not free!

        Perhaps MIT, Stanford etc. could have a competition like this to do cost-benefit analyses of Soothsaying Machines.

        The telephone booth as classroom seems like a good idea, this being the era of 4 billion global cell phones texting away all over the planet.

        If you plug coins into Minsky at MIT do you get a better course on AI than if you plug them into Madame Fifi, the Mechanical Soothsayer at Stanford?

        Q for the Soothmachine:

        If Miss A Scientist, a Harvard Professor marries John Swindle is she then A Swindle? Can she teach better than a rusty machine in a telephone booth? 


        ----- Original Message ----- From: "John Swindle" <swindle at compuserve.com>

        To: "A. Scientist" <angryscientist at gmail.com>; "Piper" 

        <pay_the_piper at shaw.ca>

        Cc: <dprglist at dprg.org>
        Sent: Wednesday, October 28, 2009 11:02 AM
        Subject: Re: [DPRG] Re: MIT autonomous indoor helicopter .... but can it
        teach?




          Sorry for getting off-topic, and sorry for my uncouth "regurgitation"
          remark.

          Just to answer one of the questions: I attended MIT from 1974 through
          1978. I was thoroughly disgusted with MIT and left the Institute while
          only being one Humanities course and a thesis away from graduating. (The
          thesis requirement has since been dropped for BSEE.) I learned more from
          my fellow students than from the MIT staff. I was annoyed that some
          students, who were taking the courses with me, were also grading my
          papers. That might be OK at a cheap school, but not at a school that rakes
          in tens of millions of dollars each year and only has about 10,000
          students. MIT was, and may still be, a research institute first, and a
          school second. I was pleased to have Alan Oppenheim's influence on the
          signal processing courses. Some of my friends now have children attending
          MIT, and I hear that the learning environment is substantially better than
          it was when I was there, so I should probably have held my remarks.

          If you look at some of the older videos that MIT has posted for its Open
          Courseware project, you can get an idea of how bad the instruction is.
          But, I hear that things are improving.

          Later,
          John Swindle



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